Play space in Scotland infographic

Play spaces contribute to the health and wellbeing of children and young people by providing places for recreation and learning. Therefore, having access to play space can have a positive impact on a child’s development. The infographic illustrates the relationship between the amount of play space and the number of children and young people living in urban areas of Scotland. It is estimated that on average there are six square metres of play space per child/young person living in urban Scotland.

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play space in Scotland infographic

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This infographic appeared in JONO Design e-news. The e-news is published once every couple of months and each issue contains a specially designed infographic.


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Play space


Play space is a specially prepared area intended for children and young people, usually linked to housing areas or parks and containing purpose-built equipment. For example, this includes playgrounds, adventure play areas and skate parks. Facilities within schools or paid-for tourist attractions are not included.


Each circle in the infographic illustrates the amount of square metres of play space per child/young person in each local authority area. The larger the circle, the more play space available per person. The circles are placed relative to their actual geographic location, displaying the information in an abstract way while maintaining a link to the distribution of the results across the country.


Six square metres of play space per child/young person is the Scottish average. Of the 32 Scottish local authorities, 13 return above average scores, 6 have average scores and 13 have scores below average. The infographic shows that children and young people living in urban areas of the Orkney Islands have the most play space each, while those living in East Renfrewshire, Edinburgh and Midlothian have the least amount.



Method


The Third State of Scotland’s Greenspace Report (greenspace scotland, 2018) includes information on the amount of play space in urban areas. For the purposes of this infographic, the play space data was compared to population data to determine the amount of play space per child/young person in each council area.


The population data used in the infographic was taken from the national estimates, which provide the total number of children and young people aged 16 and under living in each local authority (National Records of Scotland, 2017). The number of children and young people living in urban areas was then estimated by applying the proportion of the total population found to be living in settlements of 3,000 people or more (categories 1 - 4 of the 6-fold classification) (Scottish Government, 2014). For example, if 80% of the total population was found to live in urban areas, then this percentage was applied to the total number of those aged 16 and under to estimate the amount of children and young people living in the urban area.


The estimated urban population of those aged 16 and under was then compared to the amount of urban play space in each local authority to provide the number of square metres per child/young person.



Sources


greenspace scotland (2018). The Third State of Scotland’s Greenspace Report.


National Records of Scotland (2017). Mid-Year Population Estimates Scotland, Mid-2016.


Scottish Government (2014). Urban Rural Classification 2013-2014.

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